The American Vacation was Born in the Adirondacks

Lake George Vista
Lake George Vista

The idea of leaving the city for the mountains and lakes was viewed as an outrageous idea until a guidebook written by a young preacher from Boston in the mid-1800s touted the idea of an excursion into nature as a way to escape the demands of civilized life. A mere 36-hours by train from Boston or New York City brought cloistered city-dwellers to an expanse of mountains, lakes, and river largely unexplored. Readers were charmed and fascinated that such a getaway was within reach.

The D&H Railroad shuttled visitors to the southern shores of Lake George where a stunning view of the lake and mountains beckoned them to further discover the natural beauty of the "North Woods." The Adirondack Railway took riders to North Creek and the foothills of the Adirondacks where the rugged mountains inspired visitors to become adventurers.


The Original Vacation Continues to this Day

Steamboats in Lake George
Steamboats in Lake George

From the wealthy scions of industry who built summer homes and great camps in the late 1800s to the post-World War II era of motels and lakeside cottages; from the legendary dude ranches to the iconic amusement parks of the 50s, 60s, and 70s, the American vacation was, quite literally, born here.

Visiting the Adirondacks has become a tradition. Year after year, generation after generation, families pack up their bathing suits, fishing rods, and ski gear for a week-long visit. Memories have been made of days on a sandy beach, hikes to pristine mountain summits, ice skating on a frozen lake, catching trout from back-country steams, the loop-de-loops of an amusement park or Nordic skiing through snow-covered trees.

It's the vacation you remember.

It's the vacation you wish would never end!